Heroes and villains

🤦‍♂️️ Apple | 🎭 British theatregoers | 🎙️ Natalie Cassidy

10 May 2024

Heroes and villains

Villain
Apple, whose latest advert for the iPad is causing quite the controversy online, says The Atlantic. The minute-long spot, which has racked more than 49 million views on X, shows creative tools including cameras, books, paint, and a piano being crushed in an industrial press before the machine is raised to reveal the company’s latest tablet. “The destruction of the human experience,” wrote the actor Hugh Grant on X. “Courtesy of Silicon Valley.”

Hero
Daniel Rooney, a pub singer from Glasgow who ended up opening for Take That at the last minute, after original support act Ollie Murs had his flight cancelled. Rooney said the Scottish presenter Ross King had spotted him on stage at a nearby hotel and dragged him to the venue. “Craziest 30 minutes ever,” he said. “Also a big thanks to the Take That lads for calming me down before the show…Absolute legends.”

Hero
Natalie Cassidy, says The Times, better known as “Sonia off Eastenders”, who has surpassed hordes of “political pundits, nerdy historians, knackered dads and classic mansplainers” to reach the top of the male-dominated podcast charts. Her secret? Sticking to the “quotidian issues that truly matter”, like how to deal with drivers who cut into queueing traffic at the last minute and what to do if you accidentally put a white tissue in a dark wash. Take that, The Rest is History.

Villains
British theatregoers, according to Rufus Wainwright. After it was announced that his musical Opening Night was closing two months early due to dismal ticket sales and universally awful reviews, the musician theorised that Brexit had caused the English to lose their “imagination and curiosity”. Pull the other one. But his ridiculous excuse may provide children with some helpful inspiration, says Michael Deacon in The Daily Telegraph. “Next time they get a bad mark in maths, they can tell their parents that, since Brexit, teachers have simply become too insular to appreciate unconventional arithmetic.”

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